SPC: Overview

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Phenomics is the acquisition of high-dimensional phenotypic data on an organism-wide scale (David Houle, Nature Genetics, 2010). Phenomics is thus the study of the phenotypes of an organism and the response of the phenotypes to genetic and environmental changes.
In recent years, omics studies have become increasingly important due to their potential to increase the understanding of how environmental factors and diseases impact human health. This can in turn lead to better treatment or therapeutic strategies, resulting in improved healthcare and a higher standard of living. As such, the main research areas of the Singapore Phenome Centre (SPC) are in the clinical, biological and environmental sciences. These research studies are centred on the profiling of critical biomolecules such as metabolites, lipids, and proteins through the use of the state-of-the-art ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and NMR spectroscopy technologies available at the Singapore Phenome Centre at NTU.
The Centre, officially launched in 2015, is a unique Interdisciplinary Research Platform established to enhance research capability and explore new synergy for the newly formed NTU Integrated Medical, Biological and Environmental Life Science (NIMBELS) cluster of NTU. SPC is co-funded by NTU, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, the School of Biological Sciences (SBS), and the Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE) in association with the National Phenome Centre, at Imperial College London (ICL) and Waters Corporation. The centre is headed by Professor Jeremy Everett​ who is the Acting Director. 
SPC aims to deliver a world-class competency in metabolic phenotyping research in association with local and international research institutions, hospitals and industry. Research in the area of computational systems biology has also been established through collaboration with the Chemical and Biological Systems Engineering Laboratory (CABSEL) at Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zurich.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​