Assistant Professor Lim Xinhong

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Asst Professor Lim Xinhong, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor (adjunct)
Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, NTU
Email: xinhong.lim@ntu.edu.sg
Principal Investigator
Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR
Email: xinhong.lim@imb.a-star.edu.sg


Introduction
Dr Xinhong Lim obtained his Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from Stanford University under the supervision of Roel Nusse, Ph.D. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the A*STAR National Science Scholarship and the Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) Investigatorship in Skin Biology. As a Principal Investigator at IMB, his research on skin stem cell regulation has been awarded more than $6 million dollars in grant funding from A*STAR and a global Fortune 500 company. Dr Lim is also an Assistant Professor (Adjunct) at the LKC School of Medicine in Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, and the Cancer and Stem Cell Biology Programme, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School. He has a Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurship from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.        
Dr Lim is interested in the genetic circuitry that regulates tissue patterning, growth and repair. At Stanford University, he initiated and led numerous multidisciplinary collaborations, discovering completely new mechanisms of gene regulation and stem cell self-renewal in mammalian tissues including skin. This resulted in highly-cited publications in the most prestigious scientific journals, including Nature and Science. At IMB, he continues to work closely with international academic and industry partners to investigate the signals that pattern skin tissue and control skin cell fates, with a particular focus on sebaceous gland and hair regeneration and maintenance.   
 
Key publications

1. Lim, X., Tan, S. H., Yu, K. L., Lim, S. B. H., & Nusse, R. (2016). Axin2 marks quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells that are maintained by autocrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(11), E1498–E1505. Lim, X., Tan, S. H., Yu, K. L., Lim, S. B. H., & Nusse, R. (2016). Axin2 marks quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells that are maintained by autocrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(11), E1498–E1505. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1601599113
2. Lim X, Tan SH, Koh WL, Chau RM, Yan KS, Kuo CJ, van Amerongen R, Klein AM, Nusse R. Interfollicular epidermal stem cells self-renew via autocrine Wnt signaling. Science. 2013 Dec 6;342(6163):1226-30. doi: 10.1126/science.1239730. PubMed PMID: 24311688; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4081860.Lim X, Tan SH, Koh WL, Chau RM, Yan KS, Kuo CJ, van Amerongen R, Klein AM, Nusse R. Interfollicular epidermal stem cells self-renew via autocrine Wnt signaling. Science. 2013 Dec 6;342(6163):1226-30. doi: 10.1126/science.1239730. PubMed PMID: 24311688; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4081860.
3. Lim X, Nusse R. Wnt signaling in skin development, homeostasis, and disease. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2013 Feb 1;5(2). pii: a008029. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a008029. Review. PubMed PMID: 23209129; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3552514. Also published as a chapter in the book Signaling by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press (2013).